Are we just a bit thick up here in the Midlands?


17 of the top GCSE schools in the country are in London and the south east of England.
Schools from London and the south east dominate the list of high achievers in this year’s table of GCSE successes. Independent, grammar and single sex schools have outstripped state and mixed schools. The north of England is notable by its absence from the top table, and the Midlands gets barely a mention.
In a list of the schools that have got the highest percentage of A* and A grades this summer, King Edward VIth Camp Hill School for Boys in Birmingham is the highest Midlands school, in 12th place with 89% of students achieving A* and A grades at GCSE.
Altrincham Grammar School is the highest placed school from the north of England, and is the only school north of Birmingham in the top 50 – it comes in at 17th place with 86.83%. The only other school in the top twenty from outside London and the south east is Headington School in Oxford.
The top three schools in the country are all independent schools from the south east. The highest placed state school is The Henrietta Barnett School, an all girls school in Barnet, London.
Wolverhampton Girls High School comes 37th in the table, King Edwards Camp Hill School for Girls in Birmingham comes just behind in 40th place, King EdwardVIth Girls School in Handsworth is 48th, and Sutton Coldfield Girls Grammar School is 52nd.

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One response to “Are we just a bit thick up here in the Midlands?

  1. I don’t think it is anything new, that children who live in wealthier areas of the country do better at school. Maybe their parents have higher expectations of them, as they have achieved success themselves and are often more educated. Or maybe it is that having wealth enables those parents to pay for the best education for their children. Unfortunately, this ensures that children with a better start in life will grow up to be in positions of power and have the funds to ensure their children have the best that money can buy. This is how the class system is maintained.